B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF- Are you looking for B.sc + B.ed integrated course syllabus? Do you want to enroll yourself in B.SC B.ED integrated course? Here you will get an integrated B.SC B.ED syllabus in English. 

B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

SEMESTER-WISE COURSES AND CREDITS 

SEMESTER – I (20 +4 Credits)

Course

Title

Credit (s)

Marks

Internal

Assessment

External

Exam.

Full Marks

Theory

(Teaching Hrs.)

Practicum

(hours/

weeks)

PC-3

Education, School and Society

4 (64 Hrs.)

1(32)

30

70

100

PC-5

Childhood and Growing up

4 (64 Hrs.)

1(32)

30

70

100

PC-8

 Curriculum Studies

4 (64 Hrs.)

1(32)

30

70

100

PPP

Pedagogy Processes and Practices

4(64 Hrs.)

1(32)

30

70

100

PSS-A

Pedagogy of School Subject Gr.A-P.I

4 (64 Hrs.)

1(32)

30

70

100

 PSS-Pr.-I

 SI -I  School Exposure

-

04

(2 weeks)

100

-

100

Total

20

(320Hrs.)

 04

(160hrs & 2 weeks)

150+

100

350

500+

      100














SEMESTER- II (18 +6 Credits)

Course

Title

Credit (s)

Marks

Internal

Assessment

External

Exam.

Full Marks

Theory

(Teaching Hrs.)

Practicum

(weeks)

PC-4

Historical, Political and Economic     Perspectives of Education  

4 (64 Hrs.)

-

30

70

100

PC-6

Learner and Learning

4 (64 Hrs.)

-

30

70

100

PC-10

 Learning Assessment

2 (32 Hrs.)

-

15

35

50

RTS-3

Inclusive Schooling

2(32 Hrs.)

-

15

35

50

RTS-4

ICT in Education

2(32 Hrs.)

-

15

35

50

PSS-A

Pedagogy of School Subjects Gr.A-  P.2

4 (64 Hrs.)

-

30

70

100

RTS- P3

Communication and Expository Writing

-

02

(64Hrs)

50

-

50

PSS-Pr.-II

SI-II Exposure to Multi-cultural Contexts in Schools

-

04

(4 weeks)

100

-

100

Total

18

(320Hrs.)

 06

 

135+

150

315

450+

      150















SEMESTER- III (14+10 Credits)

Course

Title

Credit (s)

Marks

Internal

Assessment

External

Exam.

Full Marks

Theory

(Teaching Hrs.)

Practicum

(Hrs./weeks)

PC-1

Introduction to Study of Education  

4(64 Hrs.)

-

30

70

100

PC-9

Language across Curriculum

2(32 Hrs.)

-

15

35

50

RTS-1

Introduction to Research Methods

4(64 Hrs.)

-

30

70

100

PSS-B

 Pedagogy of School Subjects-Gr.B-.P.1

4(64 Hrs.)

-

30

70

100

RTS Pr.-1

Dissertation

-

2 (64 Hrs.)

50

-

50

RTS Pr.-2

Research Seminar

-

2 (64 Hrs.)

50

-

50

PSS- Pr.III

SI-III Classroom Transaction and related activity

-

4

(6 weeks)

100

-

100

PSS Pr. IV

Interaction with Community

-

1

(1 week)

25

-

25

PSS-Pr. V

Discourse with Other Related Agencies

-

1

(1 week)

25

-

25

Total

14

(224 Hrs.)

 10

 

105+

250

245

350+

      250


















SEMESTER- IV (18 +6 Credits)

Course

Title

Credit (s)

Marks

Internal

Assessment

External

Exam.

Full Marks

Theory

(Teaching Hrs.)

Practicum

(weeks)

PC-2

Philosophical Perspectives in Education

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

RTS-5

Self Development

2(32 Hrs.)

 

15

35

50

TEC-1

Perspectives in Teacher Education

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

PSS-2

Pedagogy of School Subjects-2.P.II

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

SSC-1

School Education: Systems, Structures and Functions

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

RTS Pr.-1

Dissertation

 

2 (64 Hrs.)

50

--

50

TEC-Pr

Attachment with TEIs (Elementary and Secondary TEIs)

 

4

(6 weeks)

100

--

100

Total

18

(288Hrs.)

6

 

135+

150

315

450+

150

 














SEMESTER- V (16 +8 Credits)

Course

Title

Credit (s)

Marks

Internal

Assessment

External

Exam.

Full Marks

Theory

(Teaching Hrs.)

Practicum

(Hrs,/weeks)

PC-7

Contemporary Concerns in Education

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

RTS-2

Advanced Research Methods    

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

TS

Theme-based Specialization (a.P.I)

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

Theme-based Specialization (b.P.I)

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

RTS Pr.-1

Dissertation

 

2 (64 Hrs.)

50

--

50

PSS- Pr.III

SI-III Classroom Transaction and related activity(Contd.)

 

4

(6 weeks)

100

--

100

TS Pr.1

Theme Area Practicum

 

2

(2 weeks)

50

--

50

Total

16

(256Hrs.)

 8

 

120+

200

280

400+

      200














SEMESTER- VI (20 +4 Credits)

Course

Title

Credit (s)

Marks

Internal

Assessment

External

Exam.

Full Marks

Theory

(Teaching Hrs.)

Practicum

(Hrs,/

weeks)

TEC-2

Issues and Research in Teacher Education

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

SSC-2

Emerging Issues in Elementary Education

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

SSC-3

Emerging Issues in Secondary and Senior Secondary Education

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

TS

Theme-based Specialization (a. P.II)

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

 

Theme-based Specialization (b. P.II)

4(64 Hrs.)

 

30

70

100

RTS Pr.-1

Dissertation

 

4

(64 Hrs.)

50

50

100

TS Pr.2

Theme Area Practicum

 

2

(2 weeks)

50

--

50

Total

20

(320 Hrs.)

 4

 

150+

100

350+

50

500+

      150















B.SC B.ED Integrated Course Syllabus PDF

FIRST SEMESTER

 

PC 3: Education, School and Society

Semester-I

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext.70+Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

 

Objectives

On completion of this course, the prospective teacher educator shall:

§  State the narrow and broad meaning of education and form own concept on education

§  Identify various modes and processes of education

§  Explain the foundations of education and the aims of education as recommended by different commissions education policies and educational thinkers

§  State the relationship between school and education, school and community and among education society and culture

§  Elaborate  the linkage between education and national development

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Understanding Education

·      Meaning - derivational, narrow and broad, Eastern and Western viewpoints; Process - Bi-polar, tri-polar, multi-polar, Life-long process; Mode - formal/institutional, Informal/Incidental, Non-formal; Aims: Individual and social; Aims of education according to Secondary Education Commission (1952-1953), Education Commission (1964-1966), 

·      Education as a discipline: Attributes of a discipline, Importance of Education as a discipline; Interdisciplinary nature of education- Its relationship with philosophy, psychology, sociology, economics, science, anthropology, technology, management etc.

·      Education as a system: Its components and their interrelationships; Education as a sub-system- its relationship with other sub-systems

·      Foundations of Education: Philosophical, psychological and sociological – their implications for education

 

Unit 2: Education and School

·      School as a formal agency of Education: Attributes -  Purpose (Socio-cultural), Location, Time, Clientele/Stakeholders (primary and secondary stakeholders) and Programmes

·      School Activities & Resources: Activities – Curricular, co-curricular & other curricular/Scholastic & co-scholastic- Their organization; Resources Knowledge, Human, Physical (Material, Infrastructural, ICT) and Financial- Their sources and utilization

·      School Environment: Learner and Learning-friendly- Characteristics and components; strategies for ensuring learning-friendly environment

·      School-Community Interface: Importance, Aspects of interface, strategies for strengthening their inter-relationships, and their roles in building learning communities 

 

Unit 3: Education and Society   

·      Society as a system: Society – Meaning  and goals;    Social system & its subsystems - Concept, nature and components; Relationship between education and society

·      Education for socialization: Socialization – Meaning, aspects, and role of education 

·      Social change  and social control: Social change- Meaning, dimensions, types and factors; Social control – Meaning and modes; Role of education effecting social change and control; Social change and control influencing education

·      Education and Modernization: Meaning of modernization; Characteristics of a modernized society; Adaptive demands of modernization  and role  of education

 

Unit 4: Education and Inclusive Development 

·      Education and Development:  Indicators of development; Education promoting development- Human Resource and Socio-economic; Development facilitating quality of education

·      Inclusive development: Meaning, Dimensions (social, educational, economic, cultural, technological,  etc); Education for sustainable and inclusive development with reference to Millennium Development Goals  (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

·      Support system for Education  and Development: Major support providers – National and International bodies/agencies- MHRD, UGC, NCERT, NUEPA; State Department of Education and other expert bodies; UNESCO, UNICEF,  World Bank, DFID – Their roles

·      Other  support agencies: Civil Society groups, Teacher and Student Organizations, NGOs, Mass Media, Family and Community; Types of support provided by each agency; Strategies for establishing functional linkage among the service providers 

 

Sessional Work

Eachprospective teacher educator is required to submit any two assignments from the following:

·      Preparation of a paper on the aims of education as recommended by the commissions, education policies and educational thinkers for comparative analysis.

·      Survey of a community and working our strategies for mobilization of resources available in the community for improvement of school practices.

·      Preparation of a paper on how school has been responsible for modernization of the community within which the school is situated.

·      Preparation of a blueprint on the different areas of possible school community interface.

 

The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher educator(s) can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

 

PC 5: Childhood and Growing Up

 

Semester-I

Credit-4

Marks 100(Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

Objectives

On completion of this course, the prospective teacher educator shall

§  Explain the concepts of growth and development of human child and the underlined general principles of growth and development.

§  Describe briefly the periods and the typical characteristics of growth and development during each period.

§  Specify the contexts and factors influencing development.

§  Explain the theories of socio-emotional, cognitive and language development and their educational implications.

§  Describe the developmental characteristics of childhood development and their bearing on school and classroom practices.

§  Elaborate the developmental characteristics, contextual needs and tasks during adolescence and the role of school and teachers in addressing the challenges during this period of development.

§  State the different forms and characteristics of individual differences and the ways of meeting the classroom issues arising out of the differences.

§  Identify the learning needs during the different stages of development and adopt appropriate strategies in and out of school to meet the learning needs.

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Understanding the development process

·      Growth and development – Concept and General Principles of Development; Stages of development - concept (sequential, structural identity, critical periods, processes-reversible and irreversible), different stages of human growth and development- infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age

·      Contexts of development: socio- economic, cross-cultural- psychological, and anthropological

·      Factors influencing development:   heredity, environment, nutrition, child-rearing practices, socio economic status, siblings and peers

 

Unit 2: Theories of Child and Adolescent Development

·      Socio-Emotional Development: Erickson’s  theory of psycho-social development; Theory of development of social play- Jean Piaget 

·      Cognitive and Language Development: Cognitive developmental stages of Piaget; Conceptual and Language development theories of Vygotsky; Language development theory of Noam Chomsky; Brief theoretical framework and its educational implications

·      Developmental characteristics during childhood: Physical, social, cognitive and emotional; Role of school and teachers

 

 

Unit 3: Developmental characteristics and needs during adolescence

·      Growth and development during adolescence: Characteristics during early and late adolescence – Physical, Social, Cognitive and Language, Emotional and Moral; Challenges of adolescence

·      Context-specific developmental tasks based on specific needs and problems during adolescence; Problems of adjustment

·      Role of school and teacher in addressing the challenges of developmental needs of adolescents   in various contexts

 

Unit 4:   Understanding Individual Differences among Learners

·    Individual  differences due to cognitive, social and emotional attributes; Individual differences in learning in terms of mental ability, rate of learning , motivation to learn, learning style, attitude etc.; recognizing the  uniqueness of the  learner

·    Learners with different mental abilities:   intelligence, emotional intelligence and creativity- their concept, nature and assessment; categorization of learners based on mental abilities

·    Managing individual differences in learning – learning needs of different types of learners (gifted and backward learners; fast and slow learners);

 

Sessional Work

Eachprospective teacher educator is required to submit any two assignments from the following:

·       Case Study of a problem child / a slow learner/ a disadvantaged child

·       Rating of student-teachers’ classroom  performance (of any 5 student-teachers’ performance)

·       Analysis of the common behavioural problems   observed in the classroom   suggesting the ways to address them.

·       Preparation of five activities for promoting creativity among the school students.

 

 The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher educator(s) can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.


                                   PC-8:Curriculum Studies

 

Semester-I

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher educator shall: 

§  Understand the bases and components of curriculum and the theories of curriculum development.

§  Analyze the concern and issues of curriculum development.

§  Distinguish the different approaches to curriculum development.

§  Explain the various models of curriculum.

§  Understand the integrated and interdisciplinary nature of learning experiences.

 

Detailed Course Content

Unit 1: Understanding Curriculum

·           Curriculum : Concept – Difference between curriculum and courses of    studies/syllabus, , Functions (as Product, Process and Programme), Components (core and elective)  

·           Bases of Curriculum : Philosophical, Psychological and Sociological

·           Types/Approaches: Subject-centred, Activity-centred, Learner-centred, Learning-centred, Humanistic – Meaning and characteristics

·           Curriculum Policy and Framework: Mandates for formulation of curriculum policy- constitutional, socio-cultural, environmental, economic, political, global concerns; Curriculum Framework – concept, components/coverage, principles of  development; NCF2005 and  NCFTE-2009 with reference to their objectives, principles  and recommendations

 

Unit 2: Curriculum Development

·           Determinants – Socio-economic, Political, Cultural, and  Educational

·           Principles: Need-based, Relevance, Flexibility, Cotextuality etc.

·           Process/Stages – Need Identification,  Identification of resources and strategies, preparation, sharing and feedback, finalization at different levels (National, State,  and Institution)

·           Issues and concerns in curriculum development : Centralized and decentralized processes, Plurality,  Political, Cultural,  Relevance, Rigidity for no-renewal

 

Unit 3: Models of Curriculum Development

·           Models

ü  Tyler’s Model (1949)

ü  Hilda Taba, 1962 Model

ü  Nicholls and Nicholls Model (1972)

ü  Willes and Bondi – 1989 Model

ü  Futuristic Model

ü  Need Assessment Model

(Each model be discussed in terms of their basic focus, structure, process and relevance)


Unit 4: Curriculum Transaction, Evaluation and Renewal

·      Classroom Transaction: Planning (time, space, manpower, material and scheme and plan of lessons), Preparation of curricular materials and activities( text and support materials, learning activities), mode of transaction and  learners’ involvement-  resource management (use of TLMs, activity and question banks etc), use of assessment mechanism for learning   

·      Evaluation: Mode (internal and external), periodicity (continuous, periodic), Mechanism (research studies, on-site observation, FGD, on-line feedback)  

·      Renewal: Use of evaluation feedback / inputs for

-  Immediate / long-term revision

-  Specific / comprehensive improvement

·      Current provisions and practices for curriculum development, transaction, evaluation and renewal in School Education and Teacher Education in the State

 

Sessional Work

Each prospective teacher educator is required to submit assignments on any two of the following:

·       Appraisal of the present D.El.Ed. curriculum in Odisha in the light of NCTE’s recent norms and standards (2014) and the issues and requirements of elementary education in the state.

·       Appraisal of a textbook in a subject of any class in the light of the recommendations of NCF-2005.

·       Evaluation of a textbook in a subject of any class in the light of learner-centered and community-centered considerations.

·       Developing a design with suggestions for improving a textbook of any subject to make local specific in terms of socio-cultural and environmental issues.

 

        The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher educator(s) can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.


       PPP: Pedagogy Processes And Practices

Semester-I

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher educator shall:

§  Specify different aspects of quality learning and the issues affecting quality of classroom learning.

§  Understand various approaches and methods of learning and teaching.

§  State the importance of teaching learning materials and their management in classroom situation

§  Elaborate the processes of classroom management for promoting effective learning.

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Quality in Classroom Learning

·      Dimensions of Quality Education: Learners, Learning  Environment, Content for Learning, Process of Learning and Teaching, Learning Outcomes; Concepts and indicators for each quality dimensions

·      Facilitating quality learning –  Teaching as instruction, teaching as facilitation of learning; Situated/Contextual learning,

·      Facilitating   classroom learning, Learning beyond classroom, Linking classroom learning to real life experiences,

·      Teacher as facilitator of learning: Knowledge  of content and pedagogy, Understanding  learners and their needs, Choosing/innovating appropriate pedagogy to address individual learning needs

   

Unit 2: Approaches to Learning and Teaching

·      Approaches: Subject-centred, Teacher-centred, Learner-centred and Learning-centred  

·      Methods of Learning and Teaching: Effective methods for promoting learning; Instructional methods- Lecture, Demonstration, Inductive and Deductive; Learner-centered methods- Play way, Project, Problem solving, Discovery

·      Activity-based Approach: activity and its elements, characteristics of activity varieties of activity -curricular and other curricular, activities for learning concrete and abstract contents  

·      Constructivist approach to learning: Characteristics of meaning making; Methods-  5E Model and ICON (General characteristics)

 

Unit 3: Teaching-Learning Materials

·      Importance of TLMs in classroom transaction

·      Types and Use of TLMs: No cost and low cost materials; Contextual and local-specific TLMs; Collection, preparation, storing and use of TLMs

·      Textbooks, workbooks and reference books as learning materials;Learning beyond textbooks – other sources of learning

·      ICT material as resources for teaching and learning, Open Education Resources and their use in curricular activities and teacher development programmes

 

 

Unit 4: Classroom Management

·      Management with Key Resources: Key Resources – Group and Paired work, Talk for learning, Use of local and community resources, Questioning to promote learning, Storytelling, songs, role play and drama, Involving all, Monitoring and giving feedback, Assessing progress and performance

·      Managing  multi-grade and multi-level situations: different forms of multi-grade situations, Ways of management of  multi-grade situations; Multi-level situation- characteristics, management of multi-level situation in a classroom, Problems of large size classrooms and its management

·      Planning for Curriculum Transaction: Need for planning, Types of Planning- Yearly, quarterly, monthly and daily plans; Planning for specific purposes- time management, space management, multi-grade and multi-level management

·      Planning Lessons: Need and importance of lesson planning, Steps of a lesson plan – Preparatory activities,   Activities during transaction, and Activities after transaction – Content and Characteristics of each step

 

Sessional Work

         Each prospective teacher educator is required to submit assignments on any two of the following:

·         Developing a paper of quality of classroom transactions in the elementary secondary schools of the state.

·         Prepare a seminar paper on comparative effectiveness of different approaches of classroom transactions.

·         Prepare a survey report on the types and modes of use of TLMs in the classrooms  of elementary and secondary schools,

·         Develop monthly plan of curriculum transaction on any one school subject taught in a specific class.

·         Prepare activities (in sequential order) on any two curricular topic as prescribed for a class (either elementary or secondary) for classroom transaction within a specified duration

      The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s) can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.


                 PSS-A:  Pedagogy of Mathematics (Paper-1)

Semester-I

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher educator shall: 

§  Understand the nature, scope, and values of Mathematics and its place in the school curriculum

§  Specify comprehensively the objectives of teaching and learning Mathematics at the elementary levels of school education.

§  Develop long term and short term plans along with daily lesson plans for teaching and learning mathematics at the school stage.

§  Understand different approaches and methods of teaching and learning mathematics.

§  Develop plans along with tools and procedures for conducting continuous and comprehensive assessment of and for students’ leaning mathematics.

 

Detailed Course Content

Unit 1: Foundations of Mathematics Education

·      Nature of Mathematics:  Nature and Scope of Mathematics, Nature of Mathematical propositions, Mathematical proof, structure and logic;  

·      Values of Mathematics: Cultural, Disciplinary   and Utilitarian values. History of Mathematics with special reference to Indian Mathematics. Place of Mathematics in School Curriculum, Correlation of Mathematics with other subjects; Contribution of the Indian Mathematicians, Vedic Mathematics

·      Learning of Mathematics: Importance of Mathematics at elementary level, Goals and vision of Mathematics education, Objectives of teaching-learning Mathematics at the  primary and upper primary levels, 

·      Curriculum Reforms in School Mathematics: Rationale, objectives, principles, designs and materials in Mathematics,   recent curricular reforms at the National and State levels (NCF 2005).

 

Unit 2: Methods of Teaching-learning Mathematics  

·      Learning by Discovery: Nature and purpose of learning by discovery; guided discovery strategies in teaching Mathematical concepts; Project and Play way methods

·      Teaching for Understanding Proof: Proof by induction and deduction; Proof by analysis and synthesis

·      Problem Solving in Mathematics: Importance of problem solving in Mathematics, Steps of problem solving in Mathematics, Problem Posing, Generating and solving real life problems using Mathematical principles, Situation model for solving word problems.

·      Constructivist approaches: Self-learning and  peer learning strategies, Activity-based approaches

 

Unit 3: Curricular Activities in Mathematics

·      Activities in Mathematics: Mathematics Games and Quiz,   Mathematics Exhibition, Planning and organizing, Mathematics outside the classroom. Planning  classroom activity banks

·      Learning Materials in Mathematics: Types, functions, preparation and utilization of learning materials - Textbook, Models, Calculators and computers,     Maintaining portfolio in Mathematics

·      Key Learning Resources in Mathematics: Assessing progress and performances, Monitoring and giving feedback,  Local and community resources, Using pair work, Using group work, Using questioning (both by teacher and  learners) to promote thinking, Talk for learning and Involving all 

·      Importance of Lesson Notes and Reflective Journals by Mathematics teachers, Preparation, use and follow up of lesson notes and reflection notes 

 

Unit 4: Designing Learning Experiences in Mathematics

·      Planning Mathematics Teaching-Learning: Yearly plan, Unit plan, Lesson plan; Elaborating   specific steps and contents in each step of each type of plan;

·      Content categories in Mathematics - Facts, Concepts, Illustrations, Generalizations etc. Mapping of Mathematics contents at the elementary stage, Integration of Mathematics contents with other subjects at the elementary stage  

·      Developing lesson plans in specific contents in Mathematics for beginners and learners at the elementary school stage: Specifying objectives, assessing related previous experience, choice of methods, activities and materials for transaction, Making Mathematics lessons joyful for learners relating the problems to real life situations. 

·      Assessing Mathematics Learning at the Elementary Stage: Assessment for learning- informal and formal methods, Assignment, Project and Portfolios; Assessment of learning mathematics- Unit tests; Non-testing methods of assessing learning of Mathematical concepts; Remedial and Enrichment programmes in Mathematics at elementary stage; Planning for continuous assessment of classroom learning in Mathematics

 

Sessional Work

Each prospective teacher educator is required to submit assignments on any two of the following:

 

·       Collection of the names of Mathematicians and preparation of a report about their contribution to Mathematics.

·       Group activity for preparation of concept maps on any topic of school mathematics.

·       Development of learning activities on different topics of Mathematics (at least 5 activities on any 2 topics

·       Preparation of Annual, Monthly and Unit Plans for teaching-learning Mathematics.

·       Development of Lesson plans in Mathematics

·       Reflective paper on any problem of teaching and learning mathematics in a socio-cultural context.

        The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)   can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

 

PSS-A: Pedagogy of First Language- Odia (Paper-1)

 

Semester-I

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64


Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher educator shall: 

§  Understand the processes of and approaches to language acquisition and learning  in first language.

§  Explain the factors influencing language acquisition and learning in Odia with particular reference to language context and input rich classroom environment.

§  Identify  methods, approaches and  materials for teaching Odia at different levels

§  Develop language activities and tasks for the learners including audio-visual materials and ICT

§  Develop proper study skills and reference skills for acquiring proficiency in basic language skills in Odia.

§  Prepare plans based on the teaching learning objectives for their classroom transaction with reference to Odia prose, poetry, grammar and composition.

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Acquisition and Learning of First Language

·      Language acquisition and language learning in first language with reference to Odia – Their meaning and processes; Approaches/Theories of First Language Acquisition(FLA): Behaviourist(Watson & Skinner),  Nativist/Mentalist(N.Chomsky) and Social Interactionist(Piaget & Vygotsky)

·      Factors influencing FLA: Age, Language input, Language anxiety, Language aptitude, Language ego & motivation; Language input rich classroom environment facilitating language acquisition and language learning in Odia

·      Policies and relating to languages: Article 343-351,350A; NPE-1968, NPE-1986; POA 1992; National Curriculum Framework-2005; Importance and place of first language at different stages in school curriculum - compulsory subject, medium of instruction and examination etc.; Objectives of teaching first language at elementary and secondary levels with reference to NCF 2005.

·      Current challenges of teaching – learning first language in schools: multi-lingual context, language background of the learners, syllabus and textbooks, classroom transaction mode and teacher quality. 

 

Unit 2:Developing language skills in First Language(Odia):Listening, Speaking,      Reading and Writing

·      Listening and Speaking: Sub skills and types/ forms; Activities for developing listening and speaking skills: storytelling, dialogues, situational conversations, role plays, simulations, speech, games, contexts etc.; Materials and resource support: language laboratories, pictures, authentic materials, multi-media resource etc.

·      Reading: Sub skills; kinds – reading aloud and silent reading, extensive and intensive; Study skills: meaning, strategies for developing study skills – use of thesauruses, dictionary, encyclopedia etc.,

·      Writing: Mechanics of writing, methods of teaching writing at elementary and secondary levels; Formal and Informal writing: creative writing (short story, poem), reflective writing (essay, articles), letter, diary, notices, reports, dialogue, speech etc. 

·      Facilitating integration of four language skills  while using first language in classroom processes and real life situations; Reference skills and higher order skills in reading and writing 

 

Unit 3: Methods and Techniques of Teaching-Learning First Language  

·      Understanding the meaning of method and techniques and their differences

·       Methods: Audio-lingual method, Comprehension-Appreciation, Communicative teaching- learning

·      Techniques and Activities: Language games, Group work, Pair work, Collaborative and Co-operative work, Project and Peer interaction

·      Implications of methods and techniques for classroom transaction.  

 

Unit 4: Planning Teaching- Learning in First Language

·      Prerequisites for planning lessons: Determining the scope of content to be dealt with, specifying learning objectives, choosing methods, approaches and strategies, arranging teaching- learning materials, designing teaching learning activities and designing formative assessment strategies.

·      Teaching-learning Prose (detailed and non-detailed): Objectives, transactional strategies following communicative and constructivist approaches( 5E and ICON Model)

·      Teaching-learning Poetry: Objectives, transactional strategies following    communicative and constructivist approaches( 5E and ICON Model)  Teaching-learning Grammar: Functional and Formal Grammar; Objectives & Transactional strategies

·      Teaching-learning Composition and Vocabulary:

-   Objectives of teaching learning composition; Types of composition (guided and free);Teaching-Learning strategies for different forms of composition(Essay, Letter, Noting and Drafting);

-   Types of vocabulary (Tadbhaba, Tatsama, Baideshika, Desaja); Word formation process (Use of Upasarga and Pratyaya; Derivation from Sandhi and Samasa- their uses in different forms and meanings);Teaching –Learning strategies for vocabulary; Facilitating correct spelling of words – causes of spelling errors and remediation.

 

Sessional Work

Each prospective teacher educator is required to submit assignments on any two of the following :

 

·       Preparation of Five Lesson Plans on the topics from the prescribed text following 5E and ICON Models (at least two plans in each model)

·       Preparation of a blue print on any topic from the prescribed text and development of test items in conformity with the blue print.

·       Diagnosis of spelling problems among the learners and development of remedial materials

·       Preparation of a Rubric for developing an essay in Odia

       The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)   can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.


PSS-A: Pedagogy of Language-English (Paper-1)

 

   Semester-I

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher educator shall: 

 

§  Analyze the issues relating to importance and place of English in school curriculum, acquisition of skills in English, realization of aims and objectives of learning  English and language policy as conceived in NPE, 1986 and NCF – 2005

§  Use various methods, approaches and strategies for teaching-learning English and transact various types of lesson plans covering all aspects of English language following different approaches

§  Plan strategies for improving language skills of the learners through transaction of texts

§  Develop the ability of creating input rich classroom environment for teaching learning English

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Acquisition and Learning of Second Language

·      Language acquisition and language learning: Meaning and differences-   Psychology of language acquisition and learning – behaviouristic, cognitive and constructivist views.

·       Language acquisition and language learning in L2- meaning and process: Importance of   language context and input rich classroom environment facilitating language acquisition and language learning

·      Importance of English language in India and the world; Policies and provisions relating to languages: Article 343-351,350A; NPE-1968, NPE-1986; POA 1992; National Curriculum Framework-2005.

·      Place of English in school curriculum: compulsory subject, medium of instruction and examination etc.; Aims and objectives of teaching and learning English at elementary and secondary levels

·      Current challenges of teaching – learning English in schools: multi-lingual context, language background of the learners, syllabus and textbooks, classroom transaction mode and teacher quality

 

Unit 2: Developing Language Skills in English:  

·      Listening: Speaking : Their Sub skills and types/forms; Activities for developing listening and speaking skills: storytelling, dialogues, situational conversations, role plays, simulations, speech, games, contexts etc.; Facilitating integration of listening and speaking skills while using English in real life situations

·      Reading: Sub skills; kinds – reading aloud and silent reading, extensive and intensive

·      Writing: Mechanics of writing; methods of teaching writing at elementary and secondary levels;  Formal and Informal writing: creative writing(short story, poem), reflective writing (essay, articles), letter, diary, notices, reports, dialogue, speech, advertisement etc.

·      Integration of language skills in curriculum transaction: Processes and strategies

·      Materials and resource support: Language laboratories, authentic materials, multimedia resources, Open education resources.

 

Unit 3: Approaches, Methods and Techniques of Teaching-Learning English Language

·      Understanding the meaning of approach, method and techniques and their differences

·      Approaches: Structural-oral-situational approach, Communicative approach, Silent way, Suggestopedia, Total Physical Response(TPR) with reference to their meaning, focus, principles, techniques, advantages and limitations

·      Methods: grammar-translation, Direct method, Audio-lingual method, Bilingual method, Communicative teaching- learning

·      Techniques and Activities: Language games, Group work, Pair work, Collaborative and Co-operative work, Project and Peer interaction

·      Implications of approaches, methods and techniques for classroom transaction.  

 

Unit 4: Planning Teaching- Learning in English Language

·      Prerequisites for planning lessons: Determining the scope of content to be dealt with, specifying learning objectives, choosing methods, approaches and strategies, arranging teaching- learning materials, designing teaching learning activities and designing formative assessment strategies.

·      Teaching-learning Prose (detailed and non-detailed): Objectives, transactional strategies following communicative and constructivist approaches (5E and ICON Model) Teaching-learning Poetry: Objectives, transactional strategies following communicative and constructivist approaches (5E and ICON Model)

·      Teaching-learning Grammar: Functional and Formal Grammar; Objectives & Transactional strategies

·      Teaching-learning Composition and Vocabulary: Objectives of teaching learning composition and vocabulary, Teaching-Learning strategies for different forms of composition(Essay, Letter, Noting and Drafting),Teaching –Learning strategies for vocabulary- word formation(affixation, blending, back formation), their uses in different forms and meaning(action, qualities etc.)

 

Sessional Work

Each prospective teacher educator is required to submit assignments on any two of the following :

 

·       Preparation of 5 Lesson Plans on the topics from the prescribed text following 5E and ICON Model (at least two plans in each model)

·       Preparation of a blue print on any topic from the prescribed text and development of test items in conformity with the blue print

·       Preparation of a paper on the problems and challenged of teaching learning English at elementary/secondary level in Odisha.

·       Designing various activities/language games for facilitating learning of English

       The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)   can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

         

PSS-A: Pedagogy of Biological Science (Paper-1)

 

Semester-I

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

Objectives

On completion of this course, the prospective teacher educators shall: 

§  State the nature and importance of Biological Science and its relevance in secondary school curriculum in context with recent curriculum reforms in School Curriculum.

§  Use various methods and approaches to teaching-learning Biological Science suitable for the secondary school classes.

§  Plan units’ lessons in Biological Science using traditional and constructivist approaches for effective classroom transactions.

§  Develop and collect activities and resource materials   for their use in enhancing quality of learning of Biological Science at the secondary level.

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Biological Science in School Curriculum

·           Nature of Biological Science:  Nature and Scope of Science and Biological Science in particular, Bio-science as a discipline, as a dynamic and expanding body of knowledge

·           Place of Biological Science in school curriculum, Importance of Biological Science in daily life, 

·           Objectives of teaching-learning Biological Science at elementary and  secondary school level, 

·           Curriculum Reforms in Science Education: Rationale, objectives, principles, designs and materials in Science, recent curricular reforms at the National and State levels (NCF 2005).

 

Unit 2: Approaches and Methods of Teaching-learning Biological Science

·           Observation – Types, importance in Bio-Science, process, recording of observation

·           Experimentation: Experimentation under controlled conditions within laboratory and beyond laboratory situation; Process and limitations.

·           Problem Solving: Problem identification, formulation of hypotheses, collection of data, testing hypotheses and arriving at solution.

·           Demonstration-cum-Discussion

·           Project:  Situation analysis, selection of the project, preparation of the project proposal, implementation of the project, evaluation and reporting.

·           Use of ICT for self-learning, collaborative learning Concept Mapping.

 

Unit 3: Planning for Teaching and Learning in Biological Science

·            Need for planning teaching-learning experiences in Biological Science

·            Identification of Concepts and unifying themes related to Biologica Science, inter-relation among various concepts in Biological Science 

·            Designing of Year plan and Unit Plan in Biologica Science and its significance in understanding comprehensive nature of knowledge 

·            Writing learning objectives for different content areas in Biological Science

·            Planning lessons based on behaviourist and constructivist approaches-5E model, ICON model considering learners with different pace, 

·            Assessment of learning in classroom

 

Unit 4: Curricular Activities

·           Teaching-Learning Materials in Science: Preparation, collection, procurement  and use of teaching-learning materials in Science like, Charts, Graph, Bulletin Board, Models, ICT materials like  Filmstrips, Slides, Transparencies, TV, Audio and Video, Computer, and Internet;   

·           Learning Activities – Science laboratory activities; Observing flora and fauna in their natural setting,  Science Club, Science Seminar, Preservation of biological specimens for learning and building  Biological Museum,  Science Exhibition

·           Using Key Learning Resources for effective classroom transaction in Science  

Sessional Work

Each prospective teacher educator is required to submit assignments on any two of the following:

 

·       Preparation of year plan and unit plan for teaching  Biological Science  in any one class.

·       Preparation of five lesson plans on any topic of Biological Science included in the Science textbook for the secondary schools.

·       Developing five activities/experiments in Biological Science and prepare a brief report,

·       Collection and preservation of biological specimens from the immediate environment (at least five,  selecting minimum two each from preservable plants and animals/insects)

 

The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)  

 can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

 


SI-1 School Internship–I  

School Exposure

Semester-I

Credit-4

100 Marks (Internal)

4 Weeks

 

One must have the experience of the situation and content where one is expected to work. A teacher educator / teacher is ultimately concerned with school environment, class room practices, learning situations, social context   and the trend of learning outcomes of students in the school. Hence in any teacher education programme, school exposure is an important component which ought to take place at the initial stage of internship programme.

                                                                                             

Objectives

On completion of this course, the prospective teacher educators shall: 

§  Acquaint themselves with available infrastructure and  facilities in the schools and classrooms

§  Observe daily activities of the schools (curricular, other curricular and management etc)

§  Acquaint themselves with the curricular contents of different grades

§  experience classroom teaching learning processes, pedagogy interventions, day to day school administration / management and school community  interface and collaborative practices

§  Understand the roles and responsibilities of the teachers for curricular, other curricular, co-curricular and administration related activities

§  Interact with students, teachers, and SMC/SMDC members and other stakeholders and understand their roles in school activities.

§  Develop comprehensive idea about a complete school situation.

 

                          Based on the aforesaid objectives of the School Exposure Programme, the concerned TEIs/University Departments shall spell out the related activities/tasks for the prospective teacher educators asking them to perform the same and submit activity/dimension–wise reports through their mentors to the head of the TEI/University Department for internal assessment and recording of results to be reflected in the final certificate.

 

Details of the Programme

   The programme shall be conducted in 3 (Three) phases:  Preparation, School Exposure, and Post-Exposure. The broad framework of activities during each phase has been spelt out below.

A.Preparation - (03 days)

  1. Organization of one day interaction and sharing with the school heads and teachers – on the objectives and designing of the programme and their cooperation and feedback.
  2. Organization of two day orientation programme of the prospective teacher-educators on the  objectives, modalities, reporting and sharing of school exposure experiences and allotment of  schools

      The TEI/University Department concerned is to work out the mechanism for monitoring the programme and providing onsite support. 

 

 B.School Exposure – (18 days)

The respective institute is to design the details of the exposure activities on the following aspects.

1.      Observation of different aspects of the school and recording school details – Name, Address, Location, Contact number, Back ground information, year of formation, category, management of time, SMC, medium of instruction, number of students and staff (teaching, non-teaching), Infrastructure – Building (type), rooms, laboratory, Library, Kitchen-cum-store, dinning arrangement, Common room; Facilities- Water and sanitation, Ramp, Garden, Play ground,Kitchen Garden  etc; TLM and  Equipments– Black board/White board, Maps, Models and Charts,Projector etc; Records – Official and academic records and registers; Observation of classroom – Physical condition of classroom, Teachers Learning Process, teachers behavior and classroom interaction; Examination – type and modes, maintenance of records; Teacher maintained academic registers; Other records relating to SMC / SMDC / PTA / MTA meeting.

  1. Other activities of the school, co-curricular activities (Red Cross, Scout and Girls NCC), social activities and extension activities, observation of national and international days, cultural celebration etc.
  2. District-level school achievements in games and sports, Board Examination, Library activities and any other.

The Institute/Department is to develop the required observation schedule enabling the   prospective teacher-educators to record their observation of the school activities.

 

C.Post- Exposure – (03 day)

 1. Preparation of report on different aspects observed by the prospective teacher     educators in schools.

     2. Sharing of observation reports and feedback

 

 Assessment Criteria

 

Activities

Marks

1. Reporting on School Infrastructure and    Physical Facilities

20

2. Reporting on Academic Support

20

3.Reporting on Other Curricular Activities

20

4.Reporting on Functioning of  SMC/SMDC, PTA, MTA

20

5.Presentation and Sharing of  Overall Report

20

TOTAL

100

 

SECOND SEMESTER

 

PC 4: Historical, Political and Economic Perspectives of Education

Semester-II

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext.70+Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

 

Objectives

On completion of the course,  the prospective teacher educator shall: 

§  Elaborate the genesis of expansion of education during pre-independence in India.

§  Describe the evolution of policies in education and their mandates for development of quality education in post-independent India.

§  Explain the political perspectives in education in India in respect of policy formulation and implementation of educational programmes.

§  Explain the bearings of plan provisions and priorities in education during post-independence period and the shortfall thereof.

§  Understand the implications of emerging concerns for education and the inbuilt problems and issues.

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1:      Education in India: Pre-independence Scenario

·           Education in the ancient period (Pre-vedic and Vedic)

·           Education in the Budhist period

·           Education in the medieval period

·           Education under British Rule – Educational activities of East India Company up to 1813, Macaulay’s Minutes (1835), Wood’s Despatch (1854), Hunter Commission Report (1882), Sargent Committee Report (1944)

·           Expansion of Education in India till Independence

 

Unit 2: Education in India Post-independence Scenario

·           Constitutional Provisions for Education

·           Commissions for Educational Development : University Education Commission (1948-49) , Secondary Education Commission (1952-53), The Education Commission (1964-66)

·           National Policies on Education (1968, 1986/1992)

·           National System of Education : National objectives, National structure,

·           National Curriculum Frameworks  

 

Unit 3:      Political Perspectives

·           Education and Politics : Their relationship; Politicization of Education : Nature and implications

·           Impact of Politics on various aspects of Education with reference to curriculum, freedom and discipline, role of  teacher and methods of teaching

·           Education under Democracy : Rights-based Education

·           Education under Marxism and Neo-Marxism

 

Unit 4:      Economic Perspectives

·      Education and Economics : Their Relationship; Education as an investment – return / input - output approach; Economic Development and Role of Education

·      Human Resource Development (HRD) and Education: Indicators of HRD;  Human Development Index - Components and Measurement; Role of Education for HRD

·      Five year plans and investment in Education according to priorities

·      Economic development in the perspectives of globalization and liberalization   and its impact on Education in India

Sessional Work

Each prospective teacher educator is required to submit any two assignments from the following:

·         Preparation of an appraisal report on national policies on education in India and implementation of their provisions.

·         Prepare a seminar presentation on changing political scenario and its impact on teacher education programmes in India.

·         Survey of Human Development Index during the 11th plan in Odisha  and its implications for policy and planning in education.

·         Prepare a seminar presentation on education as a liberal and professional discipline for teacher preparation and teacher development.

 

 The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)  

 can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

 

PC 6: Learner and Learning

Semester-II

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext.70+Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher-educator shall:           

§  Conceptualize a framework of learning in terms of diverse contexts and approaches to learning and learning environment

§  Reflect on the process of learning from the point of view of different theoretical perspectives and the need to adopt appropriate approach

§  State the differences among the different theoretical explanations of learning and provide appropriate justifications to  the present  teaching-learning practices

§  Elaborate the cognitive processes involved in acquiring learning experiences

§  Explain the importance of motivation and the strategies to motivate the learners  for learning

§  Describe different forms of learner’s engagement in and out of classroom while learning

§  Identify the characteristics  of individual differences among the learners and adopt appropriate strategies to meet the individual learning needs

§  Assess the learner’s progress using multiple tools and techniques on a continuous basis ensuring quality of learning at each stage of learner’s growth.

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Framework of Learning                                                                          

·           Learning: Meaning and nature (Learning as process and outcome); characteristics- intentional, conscious, rational, conceptualization, abstraction and mediated by language; Approaches to learning -  Knowledge-centric, Experience-centric and Evaluation-centric; Learner-centered and Learning-centered approaches - Concept, Purposes and Limitations

·           Learning Environment: Classroom, School and Community environments facilitating learning; Inclusive environment in classroom; Use of local knowledge and children’s out-of- school experiences in learning; Diversities in learning contexts - Linguistic, Ethnic, Social and Cultural

·           Facilitating Learning: Motivation- Meaning, Types (Intrinsic and extrinsic);   Strategies for motivating learner

·         Facilitating Learner Engagement:  Types of engagement - modeling, observing, demonstrating, exploring, analyzing, contextualizing, collaborating, multiple interpretations, critical reflection (based on action, observation, selected reading, discussion etc.).

 

Unit 2:            Understanding the Process of Learning                                          

·           Categories of learning: Gagne’s hierarchical theory; Critical appraisal of the basic conditions of learning

·           Various theoretical perspectives on human learning: Behavourist, (Thorndike, Pavlov, Skinner), Humanist (Rogers, Maslow, Bandura), Cognitive (Ausubel, Bruner, Piaget), Constructivist (Piaget, Vygotsky) with reference to their classroom implications(applicability in learning situation and role of the learning in varied learning context)

·           Learning as transmission and reception of knowledge Vrs learning as construction of knowledge; Processes facilitating knowledge construction- experiential learning and reflection, social mediation, cognitive negotiation, situated learning and cognitive apprenticeship

·           Cognitive processes and learning – memory, perception, logical thinking, critical thinking, development of concept, problem solving

Unit 3:  Meaningful learning

·Meaning and attributes – active or manipulative, constructive, reflective, intentional, complex, contextual, collaborative and conversational;

·Learning as meaning making: Concept and process of meaning making; Learner as meaning maker- Characteristics of learner as meaning maker curiosity, interest, active engagement: Role of inquiry in meaning making

·Meaning Learning as Experiencing: Observing, Perceiving and internalizing and Deriving meaning form experiences;

·Strategies for facilitating Meaning Learning in and out of school: Role of teacher

Unit 4:  Understanding differences in individual learners to facilitate learning  

·Conceptual framework of understanding dimensions of differences in individual learners (with reference to individual attributes and socio cultural contexts); Differences in learners based on predominant ‘learning styles’; Implications of learning styles for teachers

·Understanding differences based on cognitive abilities in children: Giftedness, Creativity, Learning disability, Low intellectual functioning (slow learner) and Under-achievement; Understanding learners with deviant behaviours: Attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity, Autism, Conduct disorder etc.,

·Methods/techniques of identifying individual differences: questionnaire, observation, interview, self reporting techniques, anecdotal records, case study, psychological and educational tests; Use of local knowledge and children’s out of the school experiences in learning.

·           Developing a confident learner- self esteem, self concept, self efficacy, locus of control and personality; Facilitating learning environment: Teacher’s attitude, positive emotion, self efficacy, collaborative and self regulated learning

 

Sessional Work

Each prospective teacher educator is required to submit any two assignments from the following:

·      Preparation of a write-up on “Addressing diversities in learning contexts: Role of teacher and peer group”

·      Preparation of a set of learning activities for different forms of learner engagement in and out of classroom, while learning

·      Preparation of a case study on an exceptional adolescent learner

·      Observation and identification of elements of constructivist learning in classroom situation and preparation of a report

          The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)  

 can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

PC 10:  Learning Assessment

Semester-II

Credit-2

Marks 50 (Ext.35+Int.15)

Contact Hours 32

 

 

Objectives

     On completion of the course, the prospective teacher-educator shall :    

§  Conceptualize   the nature, purpose and types of educational assessment and evaluation.

§  Develop and use different types of tools and techniques for continuous and comprehensive assessment of learning in the school situation.

§  Explain the importance of assessment for learning and its processes for enhancing the quality of learning and teaching

§  Analyze the trends and issues in learning and learner assessment.

§  Analyze and interpret results of the assessment using rudimentary statistical methods.

 Detailed Course Content

 Unit 1: Assessment, Evaluation and Learning

·      Assessment and Evaluation: Meaning, ;  purpose of assessment (improving learning and teaching); purpose of evaluation (placement, diagnosis, promotion, certification, providing feedback); Interrelationship between assessment and evaluation

·      Classification of Assessment based on: Purpose (Placement, Formative, Diagnostic,and Summative), Scope (Teacher-made, Standardized), Attributes Measured (Achievement, Attitude, Aptitude etc.), Nature of Information gathered (Qualitative, Quantitative), Mode of Response (Oral, Written and Performance), Nature of Interpretation (Norm-referenced and Criterion-referenced), and the Context (Internal, External).

            The terms to be explained in brief with suitable examples.

·      Continuous and Comprehensive Assessment: Meaning, Importance and Scope; Learning and Assessment: Assessment of Learning, Assessment for Learning, and Assessment as Learning; CCA vs CCE

·      Assessment of Learning:  Assessment at the end of learning experience; Processes of assessment of learning – testing, measurement, and non-testing methods of assessment – observation,  interview, FGD

 

Unit 2: Assessment for Learning

·      Meaning, Importance and Purpose; Nature - formative,  continuous with learning, comprehensive (assessing all aspects of learning-cognitive, affective and psychomotor), culturally responsive (elements from the local culture of the learners are extensively used in the assessment); relevance for  CCA  

·      Tools and Techniques: Wide range of formal (testing, observation schedules, video recordings etc.) and informal methods (participant observation, talking, taking notes, interviewing, engaging in activities etc.); use of testing (achievement tests of different forms, diagnostic tests, proficiency testes etc.) and non-testing (analysis of verbal and non-verbal activities, reflective journals, projects, portfolio etc.)tools; use of multiple methods and tools (situation specific combinations)

·      Self and Peer-assessment techniques, Observation, Portfolio, interview, focused group discussion, rubrics

    (Their description with examples and the context in which they are used)  

·      Provision of feedback for students and  parents- need and modes, for teachers (for timely improvement of  teaching-learning process); Role of community in CCA  

 

Unit 3. Construction of Test and Its Use

·      Steps: Planning , Preparing, Trying-out and Evaluation;

-     Planning the test: Development of table of specifications (blueprint)

-     Preparing  the test: principles of preparing test items- objective based  items- Extended and Restricted response types, Objective type items (free response type- short answer and completion; fixed response type-matching, forced/alternate choice, multiple choice); Assembling and editing the items

·      Characteristics of a good test : Reliability, Validity, Usability (discussion on   concept and use)

·      Administration of the test and analysis of students’ performance; Preparation of report and its use in enhancing learning.

Sessional Work

Eachprospective teacher educator is required to submit any one assignment from the following:

·         Preparation of 50 objective-based items, at least 5 from each type of test items in any school subject.

·         Construction of an achievement test on any topic (carrying 25 marks), its administration and interpretation of the results.

·         Preparation of a plan for CCA activities for any class during an academic session.

·         Case study of a participatory assessment  programme

·         Appraisal of current CCA practices in the secondary schools.

·         Analysis of examination marks obtained by the students in any subject in a class and preparation of a report for sharing.

 

 The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)  

 can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

 

RTS 3:  Inclusive Schooling

Semester-II

Credit-2

Marks 50 (Ext.35+Int.15)

Contact Hours 32

 

 

 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher-educator shall : 

·         Explain the changing concepts related to inclusive education.  

·         Elaborate the different categories of children with special needs, their problems in schooling and need of inclusive education to address their educational problems.  

·         State the barriers of inclusion in the existing schools.

·         State the characteristics and dimensions of an inclusive school

·         Describe the process of developing an inclusive school.

Detailed Course Content

Unit 1. Inclusive Education

·         Changing concept of inclusion (Shifting from ‘Segregation’  to  ‘Integration’ to ‘Inclusion’ ); Inclusion as ‘Education for all’

·         Inclusion in Education-  a human right (Right to Access, Equality and Quality Education

·         Inclusive Education: Definition, rationale, characteristics and principles  

 

Unit 2. Children with Special Needs

·         Types of marginalized /disabled children (physical, social and/or emotional) and their needs

·         Problems in schooling the CWSN: Physical, Cognitive, Emotional

·         Strategies for addressing their educational needs in inclusive set up: Specific attention to their needs  in classroom management - seating arrangement, aids and appliances, light and ventilation, access to TLMs, mobility inside the class, interpersonal relation and support etc, Flexible curriculum, Flexible teaching-learning strategies - Child-centered, interactive, individual, group, collaborative and participatory classroom transaction  

 

Unit 3. Inclusive School

·         Barriers for inclusion in school: Psycho-social, Infrastructural, Resource, Whole class-based instruction, Lack of  participation

·         Concept, dimensions and features of an inclusive school 

·         Developing an inclusive school: Creating inclusive cultures (building communities, establishing inclusive values), Producing inclusive policies (Developing the school for all, organizing support for diversity), and Evolving inclusive practices (Orchestrating learning, mobilizing resources)

Sessional Work

Eachprospective teacher educator is required to submit any one assignment from the following:

·               Observation of an inclusive classroom set up and reporting.

·               Preparation of a report on classroom problems faced by any category of CWSN and the strategies adopted by the teacher.

·               Preparation of a report on various types of interventions provided for any   category of CWSN in school.

·               Prepare a plan for any one school to develop it as an inclusive school.

 

The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s) 

can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

 


RTS 4:  ICT in Education

Semester-II

Credit-2

Marks 50 (Ext.35+Int.15)

Contact Hours 32

 

 

 

Objectives

       On completion of the course the prospective teacher-educator shall:    

§  Appreciate the historical development of various educational media.

§  Demonstrate understanding of the main components of the computer hardware in use.

§  Use various digital technologies (hardware and software) for creating resources and enhance learning experiences for all types of learners (including differently- abled).

§  Use various ICTs for project based/problem based constructivist learning environment

§  Explain the role of ICT in authentic and alternative assessment 

§  Understand the social, economic, and ethical issues associated with the use of ICT

§   

Detailed Course Content

 

   Unit 1: Introduction to Information and Communication Technology

·      Information and Communication Technology: Evolution, meaning, nature and application in education

·      Hardware Fundamentals: Computer hardware fundamentals (anatomy, input devices, output devices, storage devices, display devices), types of computers and Computer Network; Use of digital camera, mobile, recorder, scanner, printer, interactive white board, visualizer, and multimedia projector for creating and using multimedia resources

·      Software Fundamentals: Software – Meaning and types; System software and Application software. Introduction to office applications (Word processing, Spreadsheet Presentations,  Databases, Drawing tools, Multimedia tools, File formats and conversion, utility tools

    Unit 2: ICT and Pedagogy

·      Approaches to integrating ICT in teaching and learning: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK)

·      Determine appropriate ICT and design a learning plan for a topic; Exploration of ICT resources for teaching learning.

·      ICT for Pedagogical Innovations Development of e-content; Meaning, process and applications Web Quest and virtual field trips: Concept, process, and use in the classroom Open Educational Resources; Meaning and importance, various OER initiatives , Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), Flipped classrooms: Meaning and possibilities

·      Assistive technology for children with special needs: Tools and processes; Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

·      Role of CIET/SIETs for Integrating ICT in Education; e-pathashala, NROER,  

 

 

 

Unit 3: Use of ICT in Assessment and Management 

·      ICT and Assessment  Electronic assessment portfolio – Concept and types; e-portfolio tools  Creating and using electronic rubrics for assessment Online and offline assessment tools – Rubrics, survey tools, puzzle makers, test generators, reflective journal, question bank ICT applications for CCE

·      ICT and Management  MIS systems for educational management ICT for personnel management: e-mail, task, events, diary, networking  

·      ICT for educational management: Scheduling, record keeping, student information, electronic grade book, connecting with parents and community Computer security: Privacy, hacking, virus, spy ware, misuse, abuse, antivirus, firewall, and safe practices 

Sessional Work

Eachprospective teacher-educator is required to submit any one assignment from the following:

·         Preparation of a report on the use of ICT in teacher education programme.

·         Preparation of a report on the interventions of educational technology in the current practices of teacher training programmes in India.

·         Analysis of an educational telecast and preparation of a report

·         Hands on experience on subject specific software tools like Geogebra, PhET, Stellarium,  etc.

·         Creating digital concept maps, flow charts, timelines for a particular content

 

The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s) 

can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

 

PSS-A:  Pedagogy of Mathematics (Paper-2)

Semester-II

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64


 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher-educator shall:           

§  Understand the nature, scope and values of Mathematics, its place in Secondary School Curriculum, Contribution of Indian and other Mathematician.

§  State the objective of teaching and learning Mathematics at the secondary and higher secondary school levels.

§  Develop daily plan, long term and short term plans for teaching learning mathematics at the secondary and higher secondary school stage

§  Understand different approaches and methods of teaching learning mathematics at secondary and higher secondary school level.

§  Develop plans along with tools and techniques for conducting continuous and comprehensive assessment of students leaning Mathematics.

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Nature, Scope and Importance of Mathematics

·         Nature and scope of Mathematics: Nature of Mathematics – Abstract, symbolic, generalized, preciseness and brevity; mathematical proof, structure and logic; Value of Mathematics: Cultural, Disciplinary, Moral, Social, and Utilitarian values.

·         Structure of Mathematics: Meaning of undefined terms, defined terms, definitions, axioms, theorems, propositions – truth values, truth table, open sentences, logically valid conclusions, use of quantifies, implication, necessary and sufficient conditions, a mathematical statement and its variants – converse, inverse and contra-positive, compound propositions; Types of Proofs- Direct proofs, Indirect proofs, Proof by Contradiction, Proof by Exhaustion, Proof by Mathematical Induction

·         Place of Mathematics in Secondary School Curriculum, Correlation of Mathematics with other Subjects.

 

Unit 2: Objectives of Teaching and Learning Mathematics at Secondary & Higher Secondary Levels

·         Importance of aims/goals of Mathematics

·         Objectives of Teaching Mathematics at secondary and higher secondary level.

·         General and Specific learning objectives as per Bloom’s taxonomy with Anderson’s revision.

·         Objectives of teaching-learning school Mathematics, like Algebra, Geometry, Mensuration, Trigonometry, Statistics, Probability and Calculus etc.

 

Unit 3: Planning Teaching – Learning of Mathematics

·         Content categories in Mathematics: Facts, Concepts, Illustrations, Generalizations etc.and their horizontal and vertical linkages.

·         Content analysis in Mathematics: Concepts mapping in Mathematics taking sample contents from   Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry (9th to 12thstandard) with pedagogical analysis.

·         Designing of learning experiences in Mathematics: Projects, Portfolios, Reflective Journals, Activities; Recreational aspect of mathematics- mathematical games, puzzles and amusements; Computer aided learning and Computer based instructions;   Mathematics Laboratory and Mathematics   

·         Developing Annual plan, Unit plan, and Lesson plan in mathematics elaborating specific steps of each plan for classes at the secondary and higher secondary school levels. Developing lesson plans using 5E and ICON models.

 

Unit 4: Assessing Learning in Mathematics

·         Assessment of Mathematics learning: Unit test – Designing blue print and preparation of achievement test.

·         Assessment for Mathematics learning: Test / Assignment, Projects, Portfolios in Mathematics, group and collaborative assessment in Mathematics. Assessment as learning Mathematics: Self-assessment, Rubrics, Activities etc.

·         Non – testing methods of assessment of / for mathematics learning; observation of learner in action, rating of participation in various Mathematical task and activities.

·         Planning for continuous assessment of classroom learning in Mathematics

Sessional Work

Eachprospective teacher-educator is required to submit any two assignments from the following:

·         Preparation of a report about contributions of Indian Mathematicians.

·         Analysis of Mathematics textbooks (from class IX to class XII) to identify various categories of Mathematical knowledge, its horizontal and vertical linkages.

·         Preparation of concept map on any topic of secondary/higher secondary school Mathematics

·         Writing specific learning objectives.

·         Preparation of unit plan and lesson plan on selected unit and selected topic respectively from secondary level using 5E and ICON models.

·         Development of learning activity on different topics of  school mathematics (at least two on any topics of mathematics)

·         Analysis of errors committed by learners in Mathematics in class tests and their causes.

·         Reflective paper on any problem of teaching and learning mathematics in a socio – cultural context.

 

The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)  

 can add other projects/topics relevant to this course.

 

PSS-A:  Pedagogy of First Language- Odia (Paper-2)

Semester-II

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

 

 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher-educator shall:           

§  Understand the different roles of language;

§  Understand the use of language in context such as grammar and vocabulary;

§   Identify methods, approaches and materials for teaching Odia at various levels of school education

§   Develop activities and tasks for learners including audio-video materials, ICT and Internet; 

§   Understand the process of language assessment;

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit 1: Language and Linguistic Behavior

·         Importance, nature and functions of language

·         Language as a system: symbols and levels (substance, forms and context) of language

·         Linguistic structure and aspects of Odia language – phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic.

·         Linguistic behaviour with reference to language skills – types (receptive Vs. productive; input vs. output) and their independence and interdependence

·         Literary devices in Odia: Alankara, Chhanda and Raga

 Unit 2: Place and Manner of Articulation in Odia Language

·         Sounds of Odia language: Vowels, Diphthongs and Consonants  

·         Organs of speech: Their role in articulation of Odia sounds.

·         Stress: Meaning, pattern, form and principles.

·         Intonation: Meaning and types

·         Problems of articulation in Odia language in regional context of Odisha: Nature, causes and remediation.

Unit 3: Learning Resources for Teaching-Learning Odia Language

·           Developing local specific teaching learning materials& ICT based instructional material

·           Innovative practices: Online language learning resources- access and use of ICT; Use of language laboratory for promoting language proficiency.

·           Promoting functional competency in Odia language: Organizing language and literary activities (composing and reciting poems, writing short stories/paragraphs, framing and exchanging dialogues, vocabulary quiz etc)

·           Using Key Learning Resources for effective classroom transaction in learning Odia language

Unit 4. Assessing Learning in Odia Language

·         Facilitating learning through assessment during teaching-learning: Use of formative assessment (peer interaction, debate, reflective practices, relating learning to real life situation etc) for improving learning (diagnosis of language difficulties and improvement)

·         Assessing language skills: strategies –oral & written; peer and group assessment; assessment within and beyond class room.

·         Framing objective - based test items: extended response type, restricted response type and objective type test items relating to assessment of different language skills 

·         Constructivist approach to assessment: Rubric, Portfolio, Reflective Journal   & Open ended test items. 

Sessional Work

Eachprospective teacher-educator is required to submit any two assignments from the following:

·         Prepare a comparative study of one textbook of Odia from any class (VI to VIII).

·         Identify and prepare different types of teaching aids in language (Odia)for children with special needs.

·         Analyze the question papers of Odia language (Previous-3 years) — classes X &XII  (any board) in the light of new approach of assessment.

·         Develop a question paper for upper primary and secondary stage to assess all the aspects of language learning.

·         Devise a strategy to incorporate the suggestions given in the Ist CCE report for   the progress of the learner

·         Select any ten questions from the class VI Language (Odia) textbook which test the creativity of the learners.

·         Prepare an outline for a school magazine.

 

 The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)  

            can add other projects/topics relevant to this course


                        PSS-A:  Pedagogy of Language- English (Paper-2)

Semester-II

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

 

 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher-educator shall:           

§   Understand the different roles of language.

§   Understand the use of language in context such as grammar and vocabulary.

§   Identify methods, approaches and materials for teaching English at various levels in the Indian context.

§   Develop activities and tasks for learners including audio-video materials, ICT and Internet. 

§   Understand the process of language assessment.

 

Detailed Course Content

 

Unit I: Language and Linguistic Behaviour

·         Importance, nature and functions of language

·         Language as a system: symbols and levels (substance, forms and context) of language

·         Linguistic structure and aspects of English language – phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic.

·         Linguistic behaviour with reference to language skills – types (receptive Vs. productive; input vs. output) and their independence and interdependence

·         Literary devices: Simile, Metaphor, Image, Alliteration, Assonance and Rhyme

Unit 2:  Place and Manner of Articulation in English Language

·         Sounds of English language: Vowels, Diphthongs and Consonants  

·          Organs of speech: Their role in articulation.

·         Stress: Meaning, pattern, form and principles.

·         Intonation: Meaning and types

·         Problems of articulation in English in Indian context: Nature, causes and remediation.

Unit 3: Learning Resources for Teaching-Learning English

·           Developing local specific teaching learning materials& ICT based instructional material

·           Innovative practices: Online language learning resources- access and use of ICT; Use of language laboratory for promoting language proficiency.

·           Formation of language clubs: organizing various activities for promoting functional competency in English language.

·           Using Key Learning Resources for effective classroom transaction in learning Odia language

Unit 4: Assessing Learning in English

·         Facilitating learning through assessment during teaching-learning: Use of formative assessment (peer interaction, debate, reflective practices, relating learning to real life situation etc) for improving learning (diagnosis of learning difficulties and improvement)

·         Assessing language skills: strategies –oral & written; peer and group assessment; assessment within and beyond class room.

·         Framing objective - based test items: extended response type, restricted response type and objective type test items relating to assessment of different language skills 

·         Constructivist approach to assessment: Rubric, Portfolio, Reflective Journal   & Open ended test items.

Suggested Activities

 Each prospective teacher-educator is required to submit any two assignments from the following:

·         Prepare a comparative study of one textbook of English from any class (VI to VIII).

·         Identify and prepare different types of teaching aids in language (English)for children with special needs.

·         Analyze the question papers of English language (Previous-3 years) — classes X &XII  (any board) in the light of new approach of assessment.

·         Develop a question paper for upper primary and secondary stage to assess all the aspects of language learning.

·         Select any ten questions from the class VI English textbook which test  creativity of the learners.

·         Devise a strategy to incorporate the suggestions given in the Ist CCE report for   the progress of the learner.

·         Prepare an outline for a school magazine.

·         Identify and list Language (English) related errors common among students.

 

Note: Project work, Students Teacher's Portfolio, Activities, Presentations, Workshops and Educational tours to be carried out during both the years.  (Every student has to prepare her/his own portfolio and four projects are compulsory for each semester.)

     The topics for the sessional work listed here are suggestive. The concerned teacher    educator(s)  

      can add other projects/topics relevant to this course

 

PSS-A:  Pedagogy of Biological Science (Paper-2)

Semester-II

Credit-4

Marks 100 (Ext. 70+ Int.30)

Contact Hours 64

 

 

Objectives

On completion of the course the prospective teacher-educator shall: 

§  Develop understanding about linkage among different concepts and themes in Biological sciences and also with real world/ life.

§  Explore different ways to create learning situations for different concepts of Biological sciences for learners of different abilities

§  Effectively use different activities and laboratory experiments for facilitating learning of Biological sciences

§  Develop appropriate assessment tools for the evaluation of learning of different concepts of Biological sciences

§  Examine different issues in Biological science and well as in pedagogical processes.

 

Detailed Course Content 

 

Unit 1: Learning Assessment in Biological Science

·         Learning indicators in Biological sciences and assessment of these learning indicators in the form of learning evidences/ outcome in classroom and laboratory

·         Construction of classroom tests and unit test.

·         Alternative strategies for assessment like assignments; reports and records (laboratory record, reports of field visits and excursion, Project work report); Portfolios and Rubrics; Preparation of learners’ profile.

·          Recording and reporting of learning evidences/outcome: Marks and grades; Assessment as reflecting process to facilitate further learning.

 

Unit 2: Pedagogical Treatments in Biology